Seed Drive Donation Nominations

Seed Drive

Final Count: 654 Seed packs set aside for donations! Thank you for helping to spread the word.

Now that our first annual seed drive is over we need to figure out where to send all the free seeds. But how do we decide if a garden is deserving of seeds? We ask you!

 

3rd Graders at High Meadow School grew Calico Popcorn in their school garden. 3rd Graders at High Meadow School grew Calico Popcorn in their school garden.

Nominations

Do you know of a school garden, community garden, or garden organization that could use a seed donation from the Seed Library?

We’d love to hear about them. Whether you are involved, or just think they’re great, you can nominate them by leaving a comment with the name of the school or organization on this blog post and why they deserve a seed donation. Groups and gardens must be nominated by January 20th. In January we’ll let you vote for your favorite nominee.

Vote!

You can vote for a garden to get more seeds.

The more votes, the more packs we’ll donate. To vote, make sure you are signed up for our monthly email. We’ll send out a voting form with all the nominated gardens in January.

Bonus!

The top 10 gardens will also be enrolled in our Green$eeds program.

Green$eeds is our way of helping to raise funds for community, school, and educational gardens. Each of the top 10 nominated gardens will be given a code. When you buy seeds online you can enter the code at checkout and we’ll automatically donate 10% of that sale to the garden. Last year Green$eeds raised over $2500 for gardens all over New York State.

Thanks for your help spreading the word about our seeds and helping us support gardening in your community.

Eligibility

To receive seed donations and be included in the voting, groups must be not-for-profit and engaged in gardening or working towards having a garden. Eligible garden must also be community based including schools, city/town gardens, and educational gardens open to the public.

19 thoughts on “Seed Drive Donation Nominations”

  • susan simon
    susan simon 12/13/2011 at 6:59 pm

    The Old Country Road School initiated organic vegetable, herb and flower gardens last year...the children and families were so enthusiastic that they expanded the gardens to reading gardens with specimen shrubs and weeping trees and then decided to plant perennial "Alice in Wonderland Gardens" with pathways that weave in and out of tall flowers and grasses ! This school would definitely appreciate seed donations !

    Reply
  • Jerome Spector
    Jerome Spector 12/13/2011 at 6:59 pm

    Gan Jonah (Jonah"s Garden) at Gan Shalom nursery school needs seeds. Thank you.

    Reply
  • susan simon
    susan simon 12/13/2011 at 7:03 pm

    The Old Country Road School initiated organic vegetable, herb, and flower gardens last year. The children and their families were so enthusiastic that they expanded the gardens to "reading gardens" with specimen shrubs and trees and then went on to plant "Alice in Wonderland Gardens" with pathways that weave in and out of tall perennial flowers and grasses ! They would greatly appreciate your seed donations.

    Reply
  • Fox Hollow Farm
    Fox Hollow Farm 12/14/2011 at 5:31 am

    Phoenicia Elementary has a very active school garden which includes programming during school and special after-school activities that school families participate in. Community members get involved, too, guest chefs from area restaurants come and teach kids about harvesting and preparing fresh food, for example. Phoenicia is a small public school serving the western portion of Ulster County which has some of the lowest household average incomes -- local and homegrown are part of our identity and something we are proud of exemplifying and supporting!

    Reply
  • Ellen

    The New York City Community Garden Coalition is having our Community Gardeners' Forum on February 25, 2012.

    We could distribute them there to NYC Community Gardeners and Urban Farmers.

    The forum is currently in the planning process now. Topic and speakers TBD.

    Reply
  • Amanda

    The Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum ,in Bronx NY , the small staff at this historic house museum dedicates much of it's time to the education of grade school children they teach not only 19th century life but, they have a well recieved Native American Program, two years ago two of the staff members started a small Native American three sisters garden, which has greatly benefitted the Original Bronx Natives program. There is hope to expand this program to included not only a larger three sisters garden but also a 19th Century Cooking Garden, which will help children from the city grasp what ther vegetables look like when they are growing.

    Reply
  • Amanda

    The Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum ,in Bronx NY , the small staff at this historic house museum dedicates much of its time to the education of grade school children they teach not only 19th century life but, they have a well-received Native American Program, two years ago two of the staff members started a small Native American Three Sisters Garden, which has greatly benefitted the Original Bronx Natives program. There is hope to expand this program to included not only a larger three sisters garden but also a 19th Century Cooking Garden, which will help children from the city grasp what their vegetables look like when they are growing.

    Reply
  • Patricia Menzies
    Patricia Menzies 12/14/2011 at 9:31 am

    Thank you for all you are doing! I am nominating Hilltop Urban Gardens in Tacoma, WA. http://www.hilltopurbangardens.com/ Begun by Dean Jackson a few years ago, HUG has several garden areas under cultivation in a central area of Tacoma. They work with at-risk kids teaching gardening, small animal care, food justice awareness and so much more. I'd love to get them wider recognition for the wonderful work they do! And a variety of new seeds would be welcome, I'm sure.

    Reply
  • Marla

    Our School at Blair Grocery, in New Orleans LA. Hope for wrecked neighborhoods and the kids that live there post-Katrina. I have never been there but learned about it secondhand from someone who has recently visited their site, and mentioned that they would welcome seed donations (I work for a farm myself). , They are combining abandoned lot reclamation with growing food to sell to low income people as well as high priced restaurants, involving and giving an alternative education to local teens with distressing backgrounds Here's an NYTimes article about it:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/16/education/16blair.html?_r=1

    And their facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Our-School-at-Blair-Grocery/180311562018355?sk=info

    Reply
  • Kerry Trueman
    Kerry Trueman 12/15/2011 at 8:02 pm

    The Dekalb Farm in Brooklyn has provided seven local groups with plots at Dekalb Market, an ingenuous open-air market created out of repurposed cargo containers that have been converted into little shops and food stalls. The folks behind the farm would like it "to become a resource not only for farmers but for all our neighbors and friends to stop by, learn, eat, relax and watch the plants grow."

    Family Cook Productions, one of the non-profits that tends to the garden, is in the process of turning a couple of the cargo containers into a kitchen classroom and event space where kids will learn how to turn all those lovely veggies they've grown into delicious, healthy meals. Full disclosure, I am on their board, so I am biased! You can learn more about Dekalb Farm and Family Cook here:

    http://dekalbmarket.com/2011/12/15/the-operative-word-is-“family”/

    Reply
  • bloemenwinkel leeuwarden

    Will any plants just grow sitting in regular water? I know you can start trimmings in just a glass of water to get the roots going, but will anything keep growing like that.

    Reply
  • John Dempsey
    John Dempsey 01/03/2012 at 7:39 pm

    I'd like to nominate Farnsworth Middle School in Guilderland, NY (http://www.guilderlandschools.org/farnsworth/index.cfm). They have an organic garden which they use for summer and school year educational opportunities, and the produce is donated to the Regional Food Bank. This past year over 980 pounds of produce was donated.

    One of their teachers, Dr. Alan Fiero, is a driving force behind the garden and also a Butterfly House they run along with it. The Butterfly House also supports a broader community effort to help expand the population of the endangered Karner Blue butterfly in the Albany Pine Bush preserve which is the butterfly's native habitat.

    Funding from state programs and the school district has dried up and now the future is uncertain. The school is looking into fundraising and volunteer-based programs to try and keep the garden running in the coming year. Receiving some donated seed from the Seed Library would be welcome support indeed.

    Reply
  • Robyn

    River and Roots community farm completed it's first (and very successful) year in 2011. Despite many roadblocks over a two year period, they were able to break ground, install raised beds and many other chores all within a period beginning around Memorial Day! This garden transformed an abandoned lot & not only provides space and support for many families who would not have the means to do otherwise, but also provides a positive social environment. In the past he organizers of this garden have leant their time to other worthy causes over the years- having met at and ultimately led La Leche League meetings together, offering countless hours of their own time for support of new mothers (all all hours of the day and night) while still managing to care for their own families and schooling their own children. This is a worthy endeavor taken by two exceptional people all for the good of others.
    http://www.riverandroots.org/

    Reply
  • Joan Castka
    Joan Castka 01/04/2012 at 4:42 pm

    When dropping my grandson off at the Marbletown Elementary School in Stone Ridge this Fall, I noticed a well tended garden with raised beds in a protected area between two wings of the school. Upon inquiry, I found that the garden is in it's 4th growing season. Originally designed and built by parent volounteers and the school's principal, the garden has flourished because 30 families came out the first season and "planted it up"!
    With 9 raised beds for growing both perennial and annual edibles, the garden also grows bulbs and perennials in its three border flower garden. Many plants were planted specifically to attract beneficial insects.
    The garden has 3 compost bins and a water barrel. It serves as an additional classroom where teachers and students learn about growing food, water-wise gardening, composting and insects. Hands-on art projects are also part of the gardening program.
    The garden continues to flourish because every classroom is responsible for care taking it along with help from the custodial staff. During the summer, the garden becomes a community garden where volunteers adopt it on a weekly basis to water and weed it in return for harvesting the summer's bounty.

    Reply
  • Jane Hamburger
    Jane Hamburger 01/05/2012 at 5:25 pm

    The 5th grade students in the Partners in Education program of Sanfordville Elementary School in Warwick, NY, is changing its neglected courtyard and its raised beds and containers into a "Conservation" Garden. We are studying about conserving water, alternative energy, and land and applying it to our courtyard. Because Conservationist John Muir is our role model, we want to follow his suggestion and make our courtyard a place of natural beauty, too.
    Our plans include a water collector and compost bins. These will be camouflaged with natural cover, which we will learn with the help of a local rustic artist. We also have engineering and design help from a certified permaculture contractor. Our teachers are teaching us the science and math connections, and we use it daily. Most recently we converted meter measures to feet and inches and drew our garden plans to scale.
    We are starting to look at seeds for vegetables and herbs that can be eaten by late June and root vegetables and flowers to welcome students back in September to the beautiful, healthy, and conservation area of our world. We will share our plans and successes with others who have unused courtyards in our school district.

    Reply
  • Dr. Susan Rubin

    I'm working as a curriculum consultant in a wonderful child care center, Mount Kisco Child Care Center in Mount Kisco NY. Their Feed Me Fresh program is an amazing garden to table nutrition program. http://www.mkccc.org/feed-me-fresh.html
    Each year we start plants from seed, this year is the first year we have a new greenhouse on site! In addition to garden and food based curriculum, we'll be adding composting and worm composting as part of a sustainability component to the curriculum.

    I wish all preschools and K-12 schools had programs like the Feed Me Fresh program.
    It will be wonderful to have seeds from the Hudson Valley growing in our greenhouse this spring!

    Reply
  • Arietta

    Montgomery Montessori school! Planning to start a school "peace" garden in the spring to serve as an educational tool for the children (preK-8th grade). The children will be preparing, planting, watering, weesing and watching their garden grow. Seed donations would help to start up their garden dream.

    Reply
  • Mirem Villamil

    Edible Schoolyard NYC is a new nonprofit that partners with public elementary schools to grow learning gardens and kitchen classrooms. We teach children how food affects their health, the environment, and their community and empower them to change the way they eat, for life.

    We have just completed our first year at our first site, P.S. 216, in Gravesend, South Brooklyn, NYC. With our 600 students and a dedicated group of volunteers, we grew enough food for class tastings and a summer farm stand. Our produce formed part of school lunch at least once a week throughout the fall. Most important, PS 216 kids have embraced the garden and are really loving the vegetables. We hope they get the chance to grow some beautiful Hudson Valley Seed Library varieties again this year!

    Mirem Villamil, Garden Manager, ESYNYC

    - Mirem

    Reply
  • Caroline Westin-Garcia

    The Wellness Committe of Anna C. Scott Elementary School in Leonia, NJ has been hard at work building the garden beds for Spring planting. We will soon be celebrating the completion of the project with a ceremony and look forward to sowing the first seeds.

    The Wellness Committe is comprised of a dedicated group of parents who understand how important it is to incorporate wellness concepts into the school curriculum. We know the garden will play an integral role in hands-on learning for our children. It will allow them to participate in lessons that incorporate lessons of science and healthy eating among many others.

    We greatly appreciate what the Hudson Valley Seed Library is doing for programs like ours. Thank you!

    Caroline Westin-Garcia

    Reply

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